Article VI Blog

"Religion, Politics, the Presidency: Commentary by a Mormon, an Evangelical, and an Orthodox Christian"

United States Constitution — Article VI:

"No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States."

  • There Is A Cure

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 05:52 am, March 27th 2014     &mdash      Comment on this post »

    Daniel Henninger in this morning’s WSJ wonders why liberals can get elected, but not govern.  He uses action on climate change as an example as says:

    Put differently, it’s not about doing something serious about global warming. It’s really all about them (a virus threatening American conservatism as well). The “them” at the U.N. summits included not just the participating nations but a galaxy of well-financed nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs.

    Not a particularly insightful conclusion really, but that parenthetical shot at conservatives is what really bothers me.  You see, if we have the same issue then I must conclude we have abandoned religion just as surely as the left.  Oh to be sure we remain clothed in our religious garb, but if we are “threatened by the same virus,” then it would seem our religiosity is in garb only.

    Regardless of your particular brand of of faith, there are two lessons you can draw from faith that sink deeply into the Great American Civil Religion.  Lesson One – there is something much bigger than the self at play.  Lesson Two – It’s about service, not self.

    Before this turns into a sermon, I would simply suggest that the key to our recapturing the Senate this year, to winning the White House in 2016, but most importantly to setting the nation back on the right course are those lessons.

    That most likely means careful and deep re-examination of our religious lives and the institutions that support them.   Take your faith seriously first and the rest will follow.

     

    Share

    Posted in Candidate Qualifications, character, Culture Wars, Evangelical Shortcomings, Governance, Understanding Religion | Comment on this post » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    Forget The Politics For Just A Minute, And Focus On The Management…

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 08:35 am, December 1st 2013     &mdash      Comment on this post »

    …of the building, roll out and incomplete rescue of “Healthcare.gov” in this morning’s NYT account of what is rapidly shaping up as the worst political disaster in governmental history.

    What you will see is a thorough and complete misunderstanding of human beings, how they behave and how they react to different situations.  Christianity starts with the understanding that humans are deeply flawed.  (Yes, we offer a path to get better, but we start with our flaws.)  The utopian visions of the left seem to cheerfully ignore this most fundamental fact.  That ignorance does more to account for the failure of this entire misguided enterprise than any other single factor.

    Once again we learn that faith matters, not religious identity, but something much deeper.  A lesson the nation needs to relearn.

    Share

    Posted in Governance | Comment on this post » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    Finding Gratitude This Thanksgiving

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 07:02 am, November 26th 2013     &mdash      1 Comment »

    I cannot find anyone who thinks the deal with Iran concluded over the weekend does anything other than brings the world closer to nuclear war.  Honestly the consensus is overwhelming, the only debate is in how bad the deal really is.

    Abounding are comparisons to Neville Chamberlain’s 1938 Munich deal with Hitler.  A deal that Chamberlain said achieved “peace for our time,” when all it really did was pave the way for Hitler’s takeover of Czechoslovakia.  The comparisons are apt.

    Bret Stephens points out this morning that this deal is much worse than Munich.

    Consider: Britain and France came to Munich as military weaklings. The U.S. and its allies face Iran from a position of overwhelming strength. Britain and France won time to rearm. The U.S. and its allies have given Iran more time to stockpile uranium and develop its nuclear infrastructure. Britain and France had overwhelming domestic constituencies in favor of any deal that would avoid war. The Obama administration is defying broad bipartisan majorities in both houses of Congress for the sake of a deal.

    That certainly jives with my understanding of the events of that time and now.  But there is one difference Stephens does not discuss that I find truly terrifying.  When World War Two broke out in the wake of Munich, Chamberlain had enough common sense to appoint Winston Churchill as the First Lord of the Admiralty.  When, mere months later, Chamberlain’s inability to lead the nation in a war was boldly demonstrated he resigned in the wake of a no confidence vote and Churchill became Prime Minister.

    My concern is that as the crisis just worsened reaches its apex I do not think this administration has enough common sense to make the appropriate changes in its composition to change the tide.  Nor would the resignation of the President (which the ego of the current President would never grant) greatly improve matters, our succession rules to the office being what they are.

    It is one of those times when I am most grateful to have faith to rely upon.  If you read this blog you may express your faith in a quite a different way than I do.   But I bet we share this gratitude.  We find it much more difficult to change the tide of events than even the British did in the late 1930′s.  But we, because of our faith, have another place to turn to try and shift the tide.

    This is what I am most grateful for this Thanksgiving.

    Share

    Posted in Governance, leadership, Social/Religious Trends, Violence | 1 Comment » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    Common Decency

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 06:19 am, October 8th 2013     &mdash      Comment on this post »

    That the Obama administration is making the kinds of decisions it is making in the “shutdown” is not surprising.  They have acted like petty, petulant children for quite  a while now – this is simply in character.  What I find troubling is that they are finding sufficient help inside the federal government to get the job done.

    There has always been a divide between the bosses and the workers.  Bosses have issued silly orders many times and in many situations in the past.  Workers tend to find a way to smooth them out.  Sure they cannot be openly defiant, but they can often be lackadaisical and ineffective in the execution of silly orders.  They also can remain remain decent towards the public.  And yet we are treated to stories that seem just the opposite.

    Maybe it’s media?  All the MSM wants to do is paint this as mean Republicans and all the New Media wants to do is show Obama for the petty man he so obviously is.  I am certain that is part of what is happening here. But there remains a meanness in the air that I find deeply troubling.  There is something about the spectacle of barricades and cones that makes this situation disturbing.  It is not enough to hang out a “Closed” sign and then let the chips fall where they may.  “Closed” in this instance seems to mean “Don’t you dare think about coming here.”  And the rank-and-file civil servant seems to share that attitude.

    I can remember many times in my life when I came up against a silly government imposed obstacle and as I stood there somewhat dumbfounded along came the civil servant of the moment who moved the barricade aside and whispered “Don’t tell anybody.”  It was just decency.  I am not hearing stories like that.  Instead it seems like the workers are relishing all this as somehow retributive for the American public being too cheap to support them individually.  “I’ll show you” is not just the unsurprising attitude from the White House, but it seems to run all the way down to the janitor at federal building X.

    That’s real change in this nation and it is not for the better.  That’s not something that can be fixed by a change in Administration – that is deep in the character of the nation.  It takes more than winning a few elections to fix a problem like that.

    What concerns me is that the institutions that can fix a problem like that seem to be waiting for electoral results instead of simply forging ahead.  Like the civil servant moving the barricade aside and whispering, we should be finding a way to be decent, even when all around us are not and we are being told not to be.  Simply put, we are better than that.

    At least we are supposed to be.

    Share

    Posted in Governance, leadership, News Media Bias, Political Strategy, Social/Religious Trends | Comment on this post » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    The Stubborn and Ego Driven Pursuit of Failure

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 06:26 am, October 3rd 2013     &mdash      Comment on this post »

    The political theater that is the shutdown show is one of the most amazing things this observer has seen in a very long time.  From “I don’t have to offer anything” to “anarchist” to “the Showdown at the WWII corral,” to any one of the other now almost countless inanities that have marked the Obama administration’s attempts to define essential and non-essential government service we are being treated to something rare.  And if one can remain sufficiently objective, something quite entertaining.

    But the lead story in this morning’s New York Times, moves this bit of political theater from rare to frightening:

    A sweeping national effort to extend health coverage to millions of Americans will leave out two-thirds of the poor blacks and single mothers and more than half of the low-wage workers who do not have insurance, the very kinds of people that the program was intended to help, according to an analysis of census data by The New York Times.

    Now the story goes on to try and blame Republicans:

    Because they live in states largely controlled by Republicans that have declined to participate in a vast expansion of Medicaid,….

    But come on, we see through this in a blue minute!  Blaming Republicans accomplishes nothing here.  They passed this mess of legislation with but a single goal and they have failed to meet the mark.  They should have either expanded Medicaid in a fashion that was not optional  (they tried, but the Supreme Court told them it was unconstitutional) or they should have exercised some leadership and convinced the Republican states to come along willingly.  Instead they chose, and continue to choose, to shove it down the throat of the American people.

    This entire mess, from the the parliamentary legerdemain that passed Obamacare to begin with to the massive absurdities that have marked this government shutdown, has been in pursuit of a laudable goal.  But this NYTimes story makes it apparent that goal has been missed by a wide margin.   Not only that, any competent administration would have seen this coming back when SCOTUS handed down their decision, and reacted.  Instead we are treated to administration and media driven efforts to hide the ball and forge ahead.  They can blame Republicans all they like, they have still failed to meet the mark.

    One must wonder at what point we slip from the world of partisan battle into the world of the delusional.  With this revelation, what we are witnessing – Obama’s unwillingness to negotiate in any fashion – is not a tough stance but a failure to recognize that he has failed to accomplish that which he intended to accomplish.

    Reality  has left  the building and only ego remains.

    This is not compassionate or equitable or praiseworthy in any fashion.  It is failure compounded on failure.

    Americans won’t stand for it.

    Share

    Posted in Candidate Qualifications, character, Culture Wars, Governance, News Media Bias, Political Strategy, The Way Forward | Comment on this post » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    Despicable

    Posted by: John Schroeder at 06:22 am, September 17th 2013     &mdash      Comment on this post »

    From WaPo’s “Post Politics” blog this morning:

    Washington Mayor Vincent Gray (D) on Tuesday suggested that the cuts made by sequestration may have hampered the response to the shootings at the city’s Navy Yard on Monday.

    “It’s hard to know (what could have prevented it),” Gray said on CNN. “We’re continuing this investigation. But certainly, as I look at for example sequestration, which is about saving money in the federal government being spent, that we somehow skimped on what would be available for projects like this, and then we put people at risk. Obviously 12 people have paid the ultimate price for whatever — you know, whatever was done to have this man on the base.”

    I honestly don’t know what’s worse, the utter logical fallacy of such “reasoning” or the absolute disrespect for the lives lost and the tragedy that is still unfolding.

    I cannot help but reflect on my younger years when I would do or say such incredibly ignorant things and my parents or other authority figures around me would gently correct me.  I was told that learning the proper amount of respect from such a tragic situation was part of becoming an adult and that if I ever expected to “amount to anything” I would need to learn that lesson.  And yet this numbskull is the Mayor of Washington D.C.

    And then this came to mind:

    1 Cor 13:11When I was a child, I used to speak like a child, think like a child, reason like a child; when I became a man, I did away with childish things.

    As we leave religion out of the public square, we lose more than a moralistic point of view.  We leave behind such simply admonitions to maturity.  We leave children in charge.

    Forgive me for preaching….

    Share

    Posted in character, Culture Wars, Governance, Social/Religious Trends | Comment on this post » | Print this post Print this post | Email This Post Email This Post

    « Previous« A New Take On 2012, And Why The Press Won’t Talk About It  |  Next Page »Swing Vote, Spoiler or Something Altogether Different? »